Amnesty International is a proud partner of Blog Action DayBlog Action Day partner Amnesty International,  have compiled a range of powerful case studies, videos, photos and information on the subject of forced evictions that you can use in your Blog Action Day posts.

What are forced evictions?

Forced evictions are gross violations of human rights under international law, in particular the right to adequate housing. Forced evictions are evictions carried out without legal protections. This means those affected are not consulted about suitable alternatives to eviction nor are they given adequate notice. Communities are not compensated for the loss of their homes nor are they offered adequate alternative housing.

The People:

Meet the people under threat of forced eviction in Deep Sea informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya. Select the people in the photo to hear their stories. 

The Action:

Infographic-WHD-1Take action: Kenyan Government must end forced evictions

No one should be forcibly evicted, no matter where they live. Forced evictions are illegal under international and regional human rights law. People living in informal settlements have the same rights to adequate housing, water, sanitation, education and health care as all others do.

Encourage your blog audience and your friends on social media to email to Kenyan Cabinet Secretary for Lands, Housing and Urban Development to end all forced evictions in Kenya.

“Nearly half of Nairobi’s population live in slums and many are at risk of forced evictions which not only often make people homeless, but also involve violence and lead to loss of access to services such as water and sanitation as well as livelihoods, education and healthcare” – Iain Byrne, head of Amnesty International’s Economic, Social and Cultural Rights team

Photo Essay:

If you would like to use the photos in this photo easy please download the originals and use the captions provided .

We are like rubbish in this country”  – Photos from comunities affected by force evictions. in Nairobi, Kenya

Video:

How to forcibly effect a community in 5 easy steps.

In every part of the world people are forced out of their homes without warning or consultation, without access to justice and without compensation. These forced evictions often involve violence. They destroy livelihoods and social networks, and drive people deeper into poverty often resulting in many becoming homeless and destitute.

This is why Amnesty International and WITNESS, along with the design firm Pentagram, got together to produce this short animation showing how governments and corporations forcibly evict people. The playlist below has the video in English, Arabic, French and Spanish. You can embed or link to the separate videos.

Audio:

“They found bulldozers crushing their houses” – Kenyan activist on forced evictions (English)

Minicah Hamisi Otieno was a resident of Mukuru Kwa Njenga slum in Nairobi, Kenya, for nine years, until she was evicted without warning by the authorities.Now she is an activist against forced evictions, and Secretary of Nairobi’s Rapid Response Team, a city-wide group of informal settlement residents and local human rights defenders.

 Listen to Minicah’s account of a forced eviction which took place in February 2012, during which three people died

Blogs, Interviews and more information

‘We don’t eat, we don’t sleep’: A message from Kenya on World Habitat Day 

Violent evictions a worrying sign for Kenya’s new government

Read the special feature on forced evictions on pages 4-6 in Amnesty’s global campaigning magazine, WIRE.

 

The Report: “We are like rubbish in this country

We are like rubbish in the country. Report on Forceable Evictions in Kenya by Amnesty InternationalAmnesty International report on Kenyan forced evictions  released on World Habitat Day, 7 October

More than half of Nairobi’s population live in extremely precarious circumstances in slums or informal settlements. Due to lack of proper planning, many of these settlements occupy land designated for non-residential purposes including roads or railway lines, or land that is privately owned.  Nairobi’s slums often lack security of tenure thus increasing their vulnerability to forced evictions, the effects of which are devastating to their lives and livelihoods.

The report calls on the Kenyan authorities to provide effective remedies for victims of forced evictions and for long term measures to ensure that evictions, where justified, are carried out in a manner that is lawful and respectful of human rights.

“Nearly half of Nairobi’s population live in slums and many are at risk of forced evictions which not only often make people homeless, but also involve violence and lead to loss of access to services such as water and sanitation as well as livelihoods, education and healthcare” – Iain Byrne, head of Amnesty International’s Economic, Social and Cultural Rights team